Saturday, December 08, 2007

  • a 16 year old pomeranian. the family was present in the room. they were wearing very formal clothes, all black, as if they were attending a funeral. i tried not to make anything of it but, during their grieving, they stated that they were actually on their way to a funeral for a friend who had died - a 44 year old woman with a nine year old daughter. they were sobbing, i cried as well and felt no need to hide my tears. the dog wimpered with the injection and tried to fight it a bit. then he laid down and rested.
  • 11 Comments:

    Blogger gumboenator said...

    this is so much better than I thought it would be. Very moving, matter-of-fact and compelling.

    Although the emotional drain on you must be painful, it seems to me that this blog is important. Thank you for doing it.

    12/09/2007  
    Anonymous mumuk said...

    it's ok what you do. we thank you for it. write if it helps, but don't doubt. it's ok.

    12/10/2007  
    Anonymous Frederick said...

    Strange reasons of making this blog, unless this really helps dealing with it. But it gives a good image of what happens there.

    12/14/2007  
    Anonymous Masuyo said...

    I'm sorry, but when my dog goes, take me too... unless there's a handicap kid around to cheer me up.

    Honestly, this is a really depressing idea. You shouldn't be spreading a couple of deaths around when there's a much larger scale to look at. If it helps you cope then go for it...

    12/22/2007  
    Blogger The Gentle Sherpa said...

    I imagine these parents having a conversation before the funeral, eventually deciding that it would somehow be better to group their children's grief all into one day. It makes grief most efficient, I must say.

    You have a very morbid blog, and that isn't a judgment. I think when others have said that it is important, or serves some sort of purpose outside of your own relief from being a benevolent, well-intentioned executioner, I would have to disagree. These creatures need no memorial other than the ones given IRL, particularly from strangers on the internet. It certainly doesn't hurt, so more power to you, but calling this blog an 'important work', minimizes the term.

    Regardless of the worlds need for this blog's existence, it is nonetheless fascinating, in both the motivations behind it, and your bleak content. I will subscribe, and therefore will have you and your heart-wrenching work in my thoughts.

    2/01/2008  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Ummm...a 44 year old woman and her 9 year old daughter? Dude, that's murder!

    2/01/2008  
    Anonymous Conor said...

    im a journalist from san diego

    reading this blog just made a HUGE impact on me.

    DO NOT stop doing this blog.

    You are doing something very important with this.

    Compassion is the one thing people dont know enough.

    To all the poepl saying this is wrong, well, this is life, why is it taboo to share an experience nomatter what the topic. We are all human beings, we share our experiences and learn from them.

    I read this post when my friend sent me it in a message.
    I was astonished. I didnt know the topic, and the first part about the pomeranian was missing, and i thought it was an amazing peice of poetry that simply explained that moment. Keep it up. I cried reading this blog.

    2/03/2008  
    Anonymous Miguel said...

    This brought back some memories. A year an a half ago our family dog had a stroke and we had to take it to the local animal shelter to put her to sleep. She was 15 years old and we had to make the unfortunate decision to end things gracefully. On the way back from the shelter we got a phone call that my grandmother died. It wasn't a fun time at all, but in a twisted way I think it helped with the grieving process on both sides. Sometimes it’s better to just have everything happen at once so you don’t get the time to dwell on things too much.

    2/04/2008  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Thank you for sharing your thoughts. In contrast to what other posters have said...they forget that the "big picture" they're worried about is made up small moments. Your kindness is so welcome in a too-brutal world.

    This story (about the basset hound), in particular, was poignant. I was reminded of having to euthanize my wifes beloved lab. 13, with crippling arthritis and metastatic bone cancer. Such a sweet pup.

    2/04/2008  
    Blogger Bill said...

    This comment has been removed by the author.

    2/08/2008  
    Anonymous Ted said...

    Wow. I'm glad you are making this blog, but how do you do it? I couldn't. I don't mean morally, I mean emotionally. I almost just cried at that story. Ignore the detractors. Some people have no soul.

    2/08/2008  

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